affective_computing

Glass Prototype

Google co-founder Sergey Brin wears his much-rumored Google Glass during an hour-long interview on The Gavin Newsom Show. After demonstrating how the glasses work, he and his wife, Anne Wojcicki—co-founder of 23andMe—discuss gene mapping for preventative healthcare, and Sergey’s role with Google X, the search company’s special research division.

Read more

Lifestyle Behavious & Health

Understanding the relationships between lifestyle behaviors and health outcomes can be enhanced by the use of wearable cameras, concludes a collection of studies in a special theme issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Three studies report on the latest preventive medicine research using Microsoft’s wearable camera, the SenseCam.
“Wearable cameras and their associated software analysis tools have developed to the point that they now appear well suited to measure sedentary behavior, active travel, and nutrition-related behaviors,” says author Aiden R. Doherty, PhD, from the Department of Public Health at the University of Oxford, United Kingdom. “Individuals may recall events more accurately after reviewing images from their wearable cameras, and in addition aspects of their immediate cognitive functioning may also improve.”

Read more

Lovotics- the new science of human-robot love

"By harnessing a new sphere of science called “lovotics”, Hooman Samani, an artificial intelligence researcher at the Social Robotics Lab at the National University of Singapore, believes it is possible to engineer love between humans and robots."

For more on lovotics follow this link.

Rosalind Picard Develops Specs that See Through You

High-tech glasses analyze a person’s emotions during conversation- for more read here and here.

Excerpt from NewScientist Tech magazine written by Sally Adee:

"ROSALIND PICARD'S eyes were wide open. I couldn't blame her. We were sitting in her office at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Media Lab, and my questions were stunningly incisive. In fact, I began to suspect that I must be one of the savviest journalists she had ever met.
Then Picard handed me a pair of special glasses. The instant I put them on I discovered that I had got it all terribly wrong. That look of admiration, I realised, was actually confusion and disagreement. Worse, she was bored out of her mind. I became privy to this knowledge because a little voice was whispering in my ear through a headphone attached to the glasses. It told me that Picard was "confused" or "disagreeing". All the while, a red light built into the specs was blinking above my right eye to warn me to stop talking. It was as though I had developed an extra sense.
Courtesy: IEEE

Courtesy: IEEE

The glasses can send me this information thanks to a built-in camera linked to software that analyses Picard's facial expressions. They're just one example of a number of "social X-ray specs" that are set to transform how we interact with each other. By sensing emotions that we would otherwise miss, these technologies can thwart disastrous social gaffes and help us understand each other better. Some companies are already wiring up their employees with the technology, to help them improve how they communicate with customers. Our emotional intelligence is about to be boosted, but are we ready to broadcast feelings we might rather keep private."