The Future of Wearable Computing

PUBLIC ACCEPTANCE
In his three decades as a cyborg, Mann says he has encountered quite a bit of “shocking behavior” by the public in reaction to EyeTap. “I can only describe it as resistance to technology,” he writes in the IEEE Technology and Society Magazinearticle. “My guess is that some people are frightened of the cameras that are necessary for the functioning of mediated, augmented, and augmediated reality. People are possibly frightened of being recorded, or just frightened of how the video may be captured and used against them at a later date.”
He notes that the people who have questioned him most have been those who use surveillance cameras, such as security guards and business owners.
But he says he thinks society’s fears of the technology can be assuaged: “The majority of individuals who raise questions about my EyeTap are appeased when I provide them with a simple explanation of what the eyeglass does and how it helps me.”

Courtesy: Steve Mann

Courtesy: Steve Mann

The ultimate goal for wearable computing is improving daily life, says Mann, who likens that objective to IEEE’s tagline, “Advancing technology for humanity.”
“I’m very impressed by that tagline,” Mann says. “When I think of it, I ask questions such as, ‘Is the technology [we are developing] making the world better for all of us?’ I believe the IEEE Society on Social Implications of Technology, of which I’m a member, is really at the core of what IEEE stands for: technology in service of humanity.”"

Story written by 21 January 2013 for The Institute Online: http://theinstitute.ieee.org/technology-focus/technology-topic/the-future-of-wearable-computing